Category Archives: Computing

Why Data Destruction Matters during IT Asset Recovery

When it comes it IT asset recovery, one often forgot consideration is the importance of keeping data from falling into the wrong hands, i.e. proper data destruction. It is well-known news that was recently hammered in by a giant study by Kroll Ontrack in conjunction with Blancco Technology Group that spanned several countries. According to…
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Excess Logic on NBC to give $100,000 back to the owner of Apple 1 computer

A Silicon Valley based surplus equipment liquidation and recycling company; Excess Logic is looking for the mysterious lady who dropped off an Apple-1 computer to give her the $100,000 back. A month ago, an anonymous lady around 60-70 years of age came to Excess Logic’s recycling center in Milpitas, CA and dropped off a couple…
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TSMC announces lithography milestone as EUV moves closer to production

TSMC and ASML have announced a key milestone in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) tech this week at the 2015 SPIE conference (SPIE is an international professional society for photonics and optics). The two companies announced that TSMC has managed to expose more than 1,000 wafers in a 24-hour period using an ASML NXE:3300B EUV system in a…
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Sequoia Supercomputer Breaks 1 Million Core Barrier

The Stanford Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) has set a new record in computational science, using the Sequoia supercomputer with more than one million computing cores to solve a complex fluid dynamics problem — he prediction of noise generated by a supersonic jet engine.  Installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)  Sequoia was named the most…
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Hard drive failure rates point to clear winners and losers in 2014

One of the most common questions we’re asked about hardware reliability is whether there’s a real difference between the various storage manufacturers. This information is typically locked up like Fort Knox, which is one reason why Backblaze’s ongoing storage reports have garnered widespread attention. Most drive reliability studies are either small scale, take place over limited…
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What Pundits Think: Cloud Predictions 2015

While some trends in the cloud market in 2015 will signal maturity – trends like consolidation and cloud service portfolio pruning, for example – some are shifts of non-organic nature. Examples of the latter include a growing focus on Asia and the effects of new data privacy legislation around the world on cloud decisions. Excess…
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How One Startup Just Changed the Game in the Internet of Things

We've known and loved littleBits for some time, and now, they just got a lot more useful with the introduction of cloudBit. CloudBit is a module, a.k.a. bit, that brings internet connectivity to anything. With the rest of the littleBit library, you can now effectively create your own internet of things, no fancy Google products…
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The top 10 countries for embracing IT

Which economies are best placed to benefit from new information and communication technologies (ICTs), bridge the digital divide and extract value from big data? Excess Logic continues reposting interesting articles. We trying to pay your attention how important to recycle obsolete electronics and e-waste to protect the environment. We'd like you to recycle e waste instead of disposing it into dumpsters. [caption id="attachment_3081"…
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14 innovations that improved the world in 2014

These aren't just gadgets that charge your devices faster or "groundbreaking" apps — they have potential for lasting impact. They can change the world. From mind-controlled exoskeletons to solar-powered toilets that turn waste into biofuel, here are 14 innovations that address some of the most important issues of our time. Excess Logic continues reposting interesting articles. We…
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Cisco’s $2.25 billion mea culpa

Cisco Systems got greedy. And now it's paying the price. On Tuesday (May 9, 2001), the network-equipment giant provided the grisly details behind its astonishing $2.25 billion inventory write-off in the third quarter, essentially admitting that it too was caught up in the Internet hype that, at its peak, gave the company the highest market…
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Here come the autonomous robot security guards: What could possibly go wrong?

Showing a rather shocking disregard for the long-term safety of human civilization, Microsoft has become one of the first companies to deploy autonomous robot security guards. Dubbed the K5, Microsoft’s Silicon Valley campus was being policed last week by five of these roughly human-sized 300-pound (136 kg) robots, each equipped with enough cameras, sensors, artificial intelligence,…
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New metal lets today’s 3D printers make tomorrow’s electronics

When entrepreneur Michael Toutonghi and his son wanted to make a rocket in their family basement, they went about it in a thoroughly modern way: though the duo wasn’t gearing up to produce their rockets by the hundreds, the production and assembly processes were still too tedious to be done entirely by hand. Well-versed in…
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Using SMART to accurately predict when a hard drive is about to die

SMART, which first started to appear in consumer hard drives about 10 years ago, is a brilliant concept — it’s meant to tell you if a hard drive is about to die — but in practice, I think we can all agree that SMART has always been rather underwhelming. Personally, SMART has never helped me…
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Chinese physicists achieve quantum teleportation over 60 miles

Hold onto your seats: Chinese physicists are reporting that they’ve successfully teleported photonic qubits (quantum bits) over a distance of 97 kilometers (60mi). This means that quantum data has been transmitted from one point to another, without passing through the intervening space. Now, before you get too excited, we’re still a long, long way off…
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Google has built a Matrix-like simulation of California to test its self-driving cars

Google, it has emerged, has built a “Matrix-style” simulation of the entirety of California to test its self-driving cars. While this in itself isn’t massively surprising given Google’s history as a software company (though it is a bit scary), the company is also petitioning California’s state officials to allow safety testing within the Matrix, instead of testing…
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The first human brain-to-brain interface has been created. In the future, will we all be linked telepathically?

International researchers are reporting that they have built the first human-to-human brain-to-brain interface, allowing two humans — separated by the internet — to consciously communicate with each other, with no additional sensory cues. One researcher, attached to a brain-computer interface (BCI) in India, successfully sent words into the brain of another researcher in France, who was wearing a…
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Evaluating the useful life of a server

Businesses live in two worlds: the real world of making profits and serving customers, and the “accounting world,” where taxes, depreciation and useful life of equipment rule. Harmonizing the two can be a challenge, and that’s particularly true with respect to server technology. Here, the definition of “economic life” often conflicts with the real-world, equipment-based…
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Options when OEMs declare equipment End-of-Life (EOL)

Why do manufacturers like Cisco, IBM and HP declare products EOL and EOS? There are many reasons why OEM’s declare equipment End-of-Life and End-of-Service including: Technology innovation makes new products and software available Less market demand on a particular model means production of that model is no longer profitable Supply of replacement parts dries up…
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How to watch Apple’s iPhone 6 event live stream on Windows and Android

Later today, Apple will unveil the iPhone 6 at a special event in Cupertino, California. Somewhat unusually for Apple, it will be broadcasting a live video stream of the event — but, for reasons we still can’t fathom, Apple restricts the official feed to people watching on an iOS or OS X device. Fortunately, if you’re…
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Google begins developing its own quantum computer chips, to prepare for the future

Google’s Quantum Artificial Intelligence team, not content with merely sharing a D-Wave kinda-quantum computer with NASA, has announced that it will now be designing and building its own quantum computer chips. Rather than start from scratch, Google will absorb UC Santa Barbara’s quantum computing group, which recently created a superconducting five-qubit array that shows promise for…
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